Highlights from Our Open House

Highlights from Our Open House

Passengers on each of our three educational cruises got to pull a trawl net and see some of the plants and animals (like this sea whip, a type of coral) that live in our estuaries. (Photo: Taylor Main)

Passengers on each of our three educational cruises got to pull a trawl net and see some of the plants and animals (like this sea whip, a type of coral) that live in our estuaries. (Photo: Taylor Main)

Two weeks ago we welcomed 2,000 visitors to our Marine Resources Center in Charleston for our Open House. Fish were touched, boats explored, marine science facts shared, games played, and lots of hamburgers consumed.

We're so grateful to everyone in the community who came out to learn and support us that day -- and just as many thanks go to our incredible staff and volunteers, who worked so hard to put on a fun and educational day that opened a window into the important work they do.

Enjoy these photo highlights of Open House, and we'll see you again in two years!

Marine educator Olivia Bueno gets help taking the water temperature in Charleston Harbor. The air temperature was an ideal 75 degrees Fahrenheit that day. (Photo: Taylor Main)

Marine educator Olivia Bueno gets help taking the water temperature in Charleston Harbor. The air temperature was an ideal 75 degrees Fahrenheit that day. (Photo: Taylor Main)

Captain Chris Brown of the R/V Palmetto shows off his ship, the largest vessel in the SCDNR fleet. (Photo: Taylor Main)

Captain Chris Brown of the R/V Palmetto shows off his ship, the largest vessel in the SCDNR fleet. (Photo: Taylor Main)

Guess how many fish eggs are in this tube? Hint: you'd need the microscope at right here to count them all. (Photo: Taylor Main)

Guess how many fish eggs are in this tube? Hint: you'd need the microscope at right here to count them all. (Photo: Taylor Main)

Visitors got to come face-to-face with several tanks of large red drum, spotted seatrout, and cobia, all of which are studied and bred at SCDNR to help boost the local, wild populations of these fish. (Photo: Mary Ellen Williams)

Visitors got to come face-to-face with several tanks of large red drum, spotted seatrout, and cobia, all of which are studied and bred at SCDNR to help boost the local, wild populations of these fish. (Photo: Mary Ellen Williams)

Slimy but cool: specimens at the coastal fishes exhibit included some unusual fish such as a ribbonfish, a remora, and a skate. (Photo: E. Weeks)

Slimy but cool: specimens at the coastal fishes exhibit included some unusual fish such as a ribbonfish, a remora, and a skate. (Photo: E. Weeks)

Kayla Rudnay gives a billfish-angler-in-training a crash course in how to out-reel his opponent on the other side of the line. (Photo: Mary Ellen Williams)

Kayla Rudnay gives a billfish-angler-in-training a crash course in how to out-reel his opponent on the other side of the line. (Photo: Mary Ellen Williams)

Just like SCDNR biologists, kids got to peer through microscopes at the tiny worms and other invertebrates that live on the seafloor and provide food for our favorite fish, crabs, and shrimp. (Photo: E. Weeks)

Just like SCDNR biologists, kids got to peer through microscopes at the tiny worms and other invertebrates that live on the seafloor and provide food for our favorite fish, crabs, and shrimp. (Photo: E. Weeks)

Turtle power at the sea turtle table (Photo: E. Weeks)

Turtle power at the sea turtle table (Photo: E. Weeks)

This cute little loggerhead and his favorite food (cannonball jelly, aka Mom) are all smiles. (Photo: E. Weeks)

This cute little loggerhead and his favorite food (cannonball jelly, aka Mom) are all smiles. (Photo: E. Weeks)

Two live horseshoe crabs let kids get up close to an animal that hasn't changed much in 450 million years. (Photo: Taylor Main)

Two live horseshoe crabs let kids get up close to an animal that hasn't changed much in 450 million years. (Photo: Taylor Main)

Can't beat the view from the bow of the R/V Palmetto. (Photo: Taylor Main)

Can't beat the view from the bow of the R/V Palmetto. (Photo: Taylor Main)

See you next time!

In the meantime, be sure to check our Facebook page for information about lab tours, oyster reef-building volunteer days, and other ways to get involved with our marine resources.

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